GERBER Mark II™ ACCESSORIES






HOME
BLUING BOTTLE
LEG STRAP
5-INCH STEEL W/ SCABBARD
5-INCH STEEL W/ HANDLE
8-INCH STEEL W/ SCABBARD
8-INCH STEEL W/ HANDLE
12-INCH STEEL W/ SCABBARD
PROTOTYPE STEEL HANDLE
SHARPENING STONES
A-W SHARPENING STONE
S-C SHARPENING STONE
SHARPENING SET
FIELD SHARPENING KIT
GERBER OIL
COMMEMORATIVE PLAQUE
MISCELLANEOUS

Copyright ©2008-2013 by John T. Sabol











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BLUING BOTTLE
[Bluing Bottle Thumbnail Image] During early production of the Gerber Mark II, one of the accessories offered was a small plastic bottle of Blueing (sic) Solution. These small plastic bottles contained Numrich Arms 44/40 cold bluing solution and have complete instructions printed on the bottle. It was advertised as an "easy ten-minute do-it-yourself operation" that allowed a knife owner "to field blue your combat knife for camouflage purposes." Original price was 50¢

However this accessory was short lived. My understanding is that since the bluing solution was poisonous, the US Postal Service prohibited Gerber from shipping the bottles through USPS package mail.

As a result of the USPS prohibition, as well as most users discarding them after bluing their knives, these little bottles are very rare.

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LEG STRAP
[Leg Strap Thumbnail Image]

[Leg Strap Detail Thumbnail Image]

[4 Leg Straps Thumbnail Image] Photo: Dave Yancosky

The accessory leg strap is designed for strapping the combat knife to the calf or leg. It is 1 inch wide by 18 inches long, 3/32 inch thick oil treated cowhide strap with a non-corroding metal buckle. It could also be ordered in a longer length. Original price was $1.00.

Although similar in appearance to the leather dive sheath straps, the leg straps are narrower and made of a thinner leather.

In the example shown in the top two photos, the Gerber name/address stamp on the strap has both a period and comma between ORE and U.S.A. This period and comma is also used on the SLANT 1 Gerber logo used on Mark II knives between 1967 and 1971.

But there is some variation in the straps as shown in the third picture. The Gerber stamps show some differences. Some straps are plain, others have a beveled edge and some with an impressed border. Most use the same non-corroding metal buckle, but not all.

Due to their scarcity, I don't believe these straps were offered for more than a few years.

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5-INCH STEEL W/ SCABBARD
[5-inch Steel w/ Scab NG Thumbnail Image]

[5-inch Steel w/ Scab SG Thumbnail Image]

[5-inch Steel w/ Scab LG Thumbnail Image]

[Steel Scabbard  Stamps Thumbnail Image]

For those individuals who did not order the Mark II with the sheath having the piggyback scabbard for the steel, Gerber offered the steel in a small separate scabbard that could be carried in pocket or pack. The scabbard has a loop on the rear that also allowed wearing on a belt.

Gerber sharpening steels are flat steel bars, approximately 5-inches long, 7/8-inch wide and 1/4-inch thick. The long outside edges are slightly rounded, have a rougher surface than the smoother flat sides and are intended as the main sharpening surface. The flat sides are intended for final honing. The bottom 1-inch is tapered to form a 7/8-inch wide chisel tip. The chisel tip can be used for hacking, prying or splitting. The top end is flat with a 1/4 (early) or 3/16-inch diameter hole 5/8-inch from the top. The hole is threaded with a 4-inch loop of leather tie to aid in extracting the steel from the scabbard.

Although commonly called sharpening steels, they are actually honing steels. Honing is a finishing operation. Small amounts of material are removed. It is not practical to perform substantial sharpening by honing.

There are four different types of 5-inch steels that can be found with scabbards. The first type is unmarked and an additional three types have the Gerber name stamped on one side of the steel at the top above the hole. The sharpener is forged from 0-1 tool steel. Chromium carbide is bonded to the surface and makes the tool hard enough to dress the edge of Gerber's high-speed tool steel knives.

The first image shows the very early unmarked NGSC 5-inch steel. These steels were issued with scabbards that had only a small stamp Gerber name on the rear of the scabbard rather than the 4-line stamp used for all later scabbards.

The second image shows an SGSC 5-inch steel with the small Gerber name stamp and square corners on both chisel ends. Note that the scabbard has a rivet as reinforcement at the throat.

The third image shows a later LGRC 5-inch steel with the large Gerber name stamp and one corner of the chisel end rounded. Note that there is no rivet at the throat.

As mentioned above, the very early 5-inch steel scabbards had a small Gerber name stamp on the rear of the scabbard rather than the 4-line stamp used for the later scabbards. The last of the 4 images shows the back side of the scabbards showing the very early and the later Gerber scabbard stamps. I've also noted several scabbard stamps that only had 3-lines and were missing the forth "SPORTSMAN'S STEEL" line.

Note that the very early scabbards had no throat rivet, then a rivet was added for some period and later the rivet was eliminated on all further scabbards.

Also note that the later scabbards have the words "Sportsman's Steel" included under the Gerber name/address stamp. The "Sportsman's Steel" name was used from the very early steels and seems to indicate that Gerber was marketing the steel to a wider group of knife users. The later 5-inch Steel with Handle does not have "Sportsman's Steel" stamped on the leather handle.

These steels came in the green and white "Lion, Knight and Banner" box and later in small orange boxes. They were eventually discontinued, replaced by the steel with handle models.

The 5-inch steel with scabbard may have been introduced prior to 1967. I believe the later 5-inch steel with handle was introduced sometime around 1970-1971. Both type steels were then being made at the same time. However at some point Gerber stopped making the steel with scabbard and only made the steel with handle.

According to "A Chronology of Gerber Legendary Blades 1939-1986" by Phil Rodenberg, Softcover, 75 pp. Publisher: Phill's Pholly Publishing (2010), the 5" steels were manufactured from the 1960's through 1993.

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5-INCH STEEL W/ HANDLE
[ 5-inch Steel w/ Handle Thumbnail Image]

[ Later 5-inch Steel w/ Handle Thumbnail Image]

[ Last 5-inch Steel w/ Handle Thumbnail Image] Photo: ebay 12/2010

The 5-inch Sportsman's Steel with Handle utilizes the same large Gerber name stamp steel as the later model 5-inch Steel with Scabbard. The unit consists of a 5-inch steel enclosed in a leather handle with a u-shaped design. The steel pivots around a two-part aluminum screw that passes through the handle and the hole at the top of the steel. A leather lanyard is threaded through a hole in the side of the handle.

The handle provides a more convenient and safer method of honing a knife blade, keeping the holding hand away from the steel. These steels with handles eventually replaced the steel with scabbard models.

Gerber sharpening steels are flat steel bars, approximately 5-inches long, 7/8-inch wide and 1/4-inch thick. The long outside edges are slightly rounded, have a rougher surface than the smoother flat sides and are intended as the main sharpening surface. The flat sides are intended for final honing. The bottom 1 inch is tapered to form a 7/8-inch wide chisel tip. The chisel tip can be used for hacking, prying or splitting. The top end is flat with a 3/16-inch diameter hole 5/8-inch from the top.

Although commonly called sharpening steels, they are actually honing steels. Honing is a finishing operation. Small amounts of material are removed. It is not practical to perform substantial sharpening by honing.

All have the Gerber name stamped at the top of the steel above the hole. The sharpener is forged from 0-1 tool steel. Chromium carbide is bonded to the surface and makes the tool hard enough to dress the edge of Gerber's high-speed tool steel knives.

The first image shows an early version in a red-brown color. The second image shows a later model with the steel chisel tip painted blue and with dark brown handle and nylon lanyard. I believe the reason for the blue tip is to hide the discoloration caused by the chisel tip heat treatment.

Although referred to as the "Sportsman's Steel with Handle", the handles do not have the "Sportsman's Steel" stamp included under the Gerber name/address stamp as the 5-inch Steel with Scabbard does.

These steels came in the Green, Lion, Knight and Banner Box and later in small orange boxes. This model with handles eventually replaced the steel with scabbard model.

I believe the 5" folding steel was introduced sometime around 1970-1971. Both the scabbard and folding models were then being made at the same time. However at some point Gerber stopped making the steel with scabbard and only made the folding steel. They discontinued the folding steel in 1992.

Then sometime around 2002, Gerber re-introduced the folding steel. The third picture shows the reintroduced folding model that has a dark brown handle and is stamped with the Gerber Slant 3 logo. Most have a groove on one side for sharpening fishhooks and on some, the chisel tip on the steel is painted blue. The reintroduced folding steels were discontinued, once more, some years later.

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8-INCH STEEL W/ SCABBARD
[8-inch Steel w/ Scab SG Thumbnail Image] At some time Gerber offered a sharpening steel, with separate scabbard, in a longer 8-inch length. The steel could be carried in pocket or pack. The scabbard had a loop on the rear that also allowed wearing on a belt. These longer steels were easier and safer to use compared to the 5-inch steel with scabbard.

The Gerber long sharpening steels are flat steel bars, approximately 8-inches long, 7/8-inch wide and 1/4-inch thick. The long outside edges are slightly rounded, have a rougher surface than the smoother flat sides and are intended as the main sharpening surface. The flat sides are intended for final honing. The bottom 1 inch is tapered to form a 7/8-inch wide chisel tip. The chisel tip can be used for hacking, prying or splitting. The top end is flat with a 3/16-inch diameter hole 5/8-inch from the top. The hole is threaded with a 6-inch loop of leather tie to aid in extracting the steel from the scabbard.

Although commonly called sharpening steels, they are actually honing steels. Honing is a finishing operation. Small amounts of material are removed. It is not practical to perform substantial sharpening by honing.

All have the Gerber name stamped at the top of the steel above the hole. Almost all have the Large Gerber name stamp. However I have noted two with the Small Gerber name stamp. I assume they were very early issues.

The sharpener is forged from 0-1 tool steel. Chromium carbide is bonded to the surface and makes the tool hard enough to dress the edge of Gerber's high-speed tool steel knives.

The 8-inch scabbards have the words "Sportsman's Steel" included under the Gerber name/address stamp.

These steels came in the small, long orange boxes. They were eventually discontinued, replaced by the 8-inch steel with folding handle. I have never seen an 8-inch steel with scabbard with a blue painted tip. If found, it is probably a later steel that has had the handle removed.

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8-INCH STEEL W/ HANDLE
[ 8-inch Steel w/ Handle Thumbnail Image]

[ Later 8-inch Steel w/ Handle Thumbnail Image]

The 8-inch Sportsman's Steel with Handle utilizes the same long Gerber steel as the 8-inch Steel with Scabbard. The unit consists of an 8" steel enclosed in a leather handle with a u-shaped design. The steel pivots around a two-part aluminum screw that passes through the handle and the hole at the top of the steel. A leather lanyard is threaded through a hole in the side of the handle.

The handle provides a more convenient and safer method of honing a knife blade, keeping the holding hand away from the steel.

Gerber long sharpening steels are flat steel bars, approximately 8-inches long, 7/8-inch wide and 1/4-inch thick. The long outside edges are slightly rounded, have a rougher surface than the smoother flat sides and are intended as the main sharpening surface. The flat sides are intended for final honing. The bottom 1 inch is tapered to form a 7/8-inch wide chisel tip. The chisel tip can be used for hacking, prying or splitting. The top end is flat with a 3/16-inch diameter hole 5/8-inch from the top.

Although commonly called sharpening steels, they are actually honing steels. Honing is a finishing operation. Small amounts of material are removed. It is not practical to perform substantial sharpening by honing.

All have the Gerber name stamped at the top of the steel above the hole. The sharpener is forged from 0-1 tool steel. Chromium carbide is bonded to the surface and makes the tool hard enough to dress the edge of Gerber's high-speed tool steel knives.

The first image shows an earlier version in a lighter-brown color. The second image shows a later model with the steel chisel tip painted blue and with dark brown handle. I believe the reason for the blue tip is to hide the discoloration caused by the chisel tip heat treatment. The later model also has two tags pasted on the steel. The first is a "Made in USA" tag and the second a tag indicating the chisel tip on the steel was heat treated. The USA tag was used around 1986-1989.

Although referred to as the "Sportsman's Steel with Handle", the handles do not have the "Sportsman's Steel" stamp included under the Gerber name/address stamp as the Steels with Scabbard do.

These steels came in the long small orange boxes. These 8-inch models with handles were eventually discontinued.

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12-INCH STEEL W/ SCABBARD
[12 Inch Steel Front Thumbnail Image] Photo: Dave Yancosky

[12 Inch Steel Back Thumbnail Image] Photo: Dave Yancosky

This Gerber Steel is 12 inches long with square corners at the chisel tip and stamped with the large Gerber name. Steel and scabbard weight is 11.9 oz. The steel alone is 10.1 oz.

Scabbard color seems to match that found on the 73-75 Mark II sheaths.

This is the only steel of this length that I've ever encountered. And the length would make it very easy to use when compared to the shorter steels.

It may be a trial piece that was rejected due to it's nearly 3/4 lb. weight. Or it could have been a special order.

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PROTOTYPE 5-INCH STEEL HANDLE
[ Prototype 5-inch Steel Handle Thumbnail Image] Photo: John Daniel [Prototype 5-inch Steel Handle 2 Thumbnail Image] Photo: John Daniel This red plastic handle is one of the prototypes for the 5-inch Sportsman's Steel with Handle. Little is known about this handle other than it came from the long time Gerber Representative in the Dallas area, Harold Bramer, after he had retired.

It is unknown why Gerber didn't adopt this design but may have been due to cost.

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SHARPENING STONE
[Sharp Stone Thumbnail Image] Photo: Pacha Kaye [Sharp Stone Thumbnail Image2] Photo: Pacha Kaye These sharpening stones are contained in a wooden box. They come in two lengths. The shorter stone measures 4-1/2" long, 2" wide and 1" thick. The longer stone measures 8" long, 2" wide and 1" thick. The engraving on the bottom of the boxes is "old style" similar to the 1960-1980's Gerber logo.

Most are Silicon Carbide, but I've noted several that look to be Arkansas stones and some Washita. I don't know the age of these but believe they are late 1960's or early 1970's

[8 Sharp Stone Thumbnail Image] Photo: Dave Yancosky [8 Sharp Stone Thumbnail Image2] Photo: Dave Yancosky

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ARKANSAS-WASHITA SHARPENING STONE
[ AW Stone Thumbnail Image] This is a combination sharpening stone consisting of a Washita "coarse" and Hard Arkansas "fine" stone, bonded together. The stone measures 4-1/2" long, 2" wide and 1" thick.

This stone is more of a finishing stone as the Washita is about 350 grit while the Hard Arkansas is around 700 grit.

These stones came in a Black box with Gold Sword in Stone logo and faint Knights and Banners background.

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SILICON CARBIDE SHARPENING STONE
[SC Stone Thumbnail Image]

[SC Stone Thumbnail Image]

This is later combination sharpening stone consisting of two different grits of Silicon Carbide. A "coarse" 100 grit and a "fine" 240 grit are bonded together. The stone measures 4-1/2" long, 2" wide and 1" thick. This stone is far more aggressive than the previously described Hard Arkansas/Washita stone.

These stones came first in a Black box with Gold Sword in Stone logo and faint Knights and Banners background. Later they were sold in a Small Orange Box.

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SHARPENING SET
[Sharp Set Thumbnail Image] Photo: eBay 07/2010

[Unusual Knife UK6A Thumbnail Image2] Photo: eBay 07/2010

This Sharpening Set consists of two double sided stones and an oil bottle contained in a plastic case. The first (dark colored) sharpening stone consists of two different grits of Silicon Carbide. A "coarse" 100 grit and a "medium" 240 grit are bonded together. The stone measures 4-1/2" long, 2" wide and 1" thick. The second stone is also double sided, consisting of a soft Washita stone on one side and a Hard Arkansas stone on the other. The Washita is about 350 grit while the Hard Arkansas is around 700 grit. This stone is also 4 1/2" x 2" x 1". I've only seen one of these sets. It seems to be a group of three items that were offered separately, i.e. the SILICON CARBIDE SHARPENING STONE, the ARKANSAS-WASHITA SHARPENING STONE and the GERBER OIL that are also listed in this section.

I believe the set dates from the early 1970's prior to the introduction of the Field Sharpening Kit.

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FIELD SHARPENING KIT
[Field Sharp Kit Thumbnail Image]

[Early Sharp Kit Box Thumbnail Image] Photo: Reno Hartzell

[Early Sharp Kit Folder Thumbnail Image]
Photo: Reno Hartzell

The Field Sharpening Kit consists of an oil-filled sharpening stone and a honing steel enclosed in a leather carrying case. Most of the carrying cases are dark brown in color. However some have been observed in a light tan color.

The stone consists of two different grits of Silicon Carbide, which is described by Gerber as a course and medium-fine grit. The "coarse" grit seems very coarse, possibly around 50 grit. The medium-fine seems around 100 grit. The stone in this kit is again more aggressive than the previously described SC Sharpening Stone.

The two stones are bonded together but note that unlike the previous stones on which the bond line is seen on the edge sides, the bond line on the kit stone splits the stone along the length on the top/bottom sides. The stone measures 5" long, 1-1/2" wide and 1/2" thick.

The first picture shows a later kit which came in a Small Orange Flip Top Box. The 1979 price was $27.50. The second and third pictures show an earlier version of box and paperwork. The earlier kit sold for $18.00.

The same Field Sharpening Kit was also made for Eddie Bauer. The belt strap on the rear of the leather case is stamped with the Eddie Bauer script logo and the 5" steel is acid-etched with the same script logo.

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GERBER OIL
[ Gerber Oil 2 Thumbnail Image] Photo: John Daniel [ Gerber Oil Thumbnail Image] This is a plastic bottle of Gerber Sharpening Oil. The bottle contains 4 fluid ounces of a highly refined mineral oil.

The label on the bottle states "Not hazardous in any manner with respect to health or food." The 1979 price was $1.25

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COMMEMORATIVE PLAQUE
[ Commem. Plaque Thumbnail Image] This is a wood display case for the 20th. Anniversary Mark II Commemorative. It consists of a 16-1/4"long by 6-1/4" wide by 1-1/8" thick block of wood. Two areas have been hollowed out, one for the knife and one for the sheath. Included is a sheet of clear Lucite plastic to act as a cover. A small envelope containing 4 brass screws is provided, to be used to fasten down the clear plastic cover. The box and cover are enclosed in clear plastic shrink wrap with original price tag of $30.00.

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MISCELLANEOUS

This area is for miscellaneous Gerber Mark II related items.


[ Gerber Shield Thumbnail Image] This wooden shield, painted with the Gerber Sword in Stone logo was fastened to the top of the older wooden, knife-display cases. The shield measures 4-1/4 inches wide at the top and is 4-1/8 inches tall.


[ Display Block Thumbnail Image]

[ Display Block Bottom Thumbnail Image]

This is a Gerber hardwood display stand made for displaying the Gerber Mark II. It is 5 inches long, 3-1/2 inches wide and 2-1/2 inches tall. It is made of 2 pieces of wood glued together. In the center of the top surface, there is a square opening 1 inch long by 3/16 inch wide that contains a hard cork insert. The knife is displayed vertically by sticking the knife point into the cork. "Gerber Legendary Blades" engraved on bottom.

The engraving on the bottom is "old style" similar to the 1960-1980's Gerber logo, however it is a more recent item. It is a non-catalog item made exclusively for the Cutlery Shoppe around 1996 and still available.


[ Gerber Sticker Thumbnail Image] This is a peel-off-back paper sticker. They came in two sizes, a 6-1/8 by 4-1/4 inch and a 3-1/2 by 2-3/8 inch, both in an oval shape. They are marked with the Fiskars name and were probably issued in early 1987 to promote the Fiskars association. (In January 1987, Gerber Legendary Blades was acquired by Fiskars Brands, Inc.)


[ Gerber White Decal Thumbnail Image] [ Gerber Black Decal Thumbnail Image] These are vinyl decals. They depict the Slant 3 logo and therefore are of 2002 or later vintage. The size is 4 inches by 3 inches and come in either white or black. They are an aftermarket item.


[ Gerber Orange Sticker Thumbnail Image] These are of the "Bumper Sticker" type. They depict the Slant 3 logo and are of recent vintage. The size is 12 inches by 3 inches and have black lettering on an orange background. I believe these are Gerber issued.

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